Professional Beauty
Professional Beauty


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Ask the EXPERTS

How can I produce a shaded brow look on clients using microblading?

Therapists are reporting that shaded, textured brows are one of the most popular designs being requested by clients and it’s easy to see why. The look is perfect for those who prefer a shadowy eyebrow make-up effect that appears soft and powdery when healed.

Technically speaking, this type of look is the combination of gradient colour (a range of position-dependent colours), accomplished using different intensities of pigment, a variety of needle selections and specialised tattooing techniques. One of the techniques is microblading, where a qualified technician creates fine hair strokes to define the brows using a specialist hand tool with disposable microblades.

When sketching the client’s eyebrows using shadows and blenders, the design should be darker and more intense at the base line and tail, but seamlessly soften to a paler, more diffused effect in the bulb and upper sections.

To achieve this, several shader needle configurations are needed for area-specific density of colour. When microblading, technicians use a hand device and often make fewer passes in the area where a lighter density of pigment is appropriate.

So, a technique called “stippling” – which places dozens of individual dots of pigment into the skin to produce a graduated shaded effect – should be integrated into the design using the specialised shader needles for blending purposes. The result is a unique brow appearance with a variety of colour and texture.

This detail-dependent procedure requires advanced eyebrow techniques and permanent cosmetic colour theory training. Untrained technicians can misuse specialised needle configurations that are imperative for the intended soft and seamless transition of colour.

At K.B Pro, we offer these courses to make sure you become a qualified microblading artist able to meet clients’ expectations.

Karen Betts is a permanent cosmetic and microblading artist. She is also director and owner of High Definition Beauty and Nouveau Lashes, and founder of permanent make-up brand K.B Pro.

How should I put together tanning packages for the festive season?

At this time of year, it’s important for a tan to see clients through from the office Christmas party to New Year’s Day, incorporating an in-salon treatment with take-home maintenance products. Ultimately, you want them to have a long-lasting glow.

The best types of packages are the ones that team a spray tan with other party-prep essentials, such as gel manicures and lash treatments, and the best time to book them in is two days before the party to allow the tan to reach optimum development. However, your salon may offer a rapid spray tan solution, which means you can tan closer to the event if need be.

Tanning brands usually offer packages with skin-finishing products that complement the in-salon treatment; for example, you could include a hero product in the overall price.

If you’re unsure, speak to your supplier and ask them to create a bespoke package for you that’s right for your client base and offers digital support for you to market the offer on social media.

You also need to tell clients to moisturise post-treatment as it’ll keep the colour even and ensure a natural fade, and to avoid lotions with perfumes, alcohols and essential oils as they will strip the tan.

Your clients should also drink a lot of water to keep their skin hydrated and eat green leafy vegetables like kale, spinach and rocket, which are high in lysine, antioxidants and vitamin A, to extend the tan.

Clara Anderson is professional tanning brand Vita Liberata’s business development manager for London. She has experience spray tanning celebrities and dealing with the business-to-business side of the company.

How can I do the perfect double-winged eyeliner?

The double flick is a dramatic and edgier cat-eye look that can really make eyes stand out. You need to start with a good base, prepping lids and the skin around the eyes with a thin layer of concealer, before fixing it in place with a light beige eyeshadow.

Then, starting with the upper eyelid and using black liquid eyeliner, move your brush from the inner to outer corner of the eye and end with a wing, aiming upwards, towards the end of the eyebrow. It should be drawn as close as possible to the lash line and gradually get thicker as you move towards the outer eye.

Now, go 2mm down from the end of the top wing and draw a parallel line along the client’s lower lash line, starting from the outer corner and ending in the inner corner, placing the brush as close to the lash line as possible.

If you’re using a pencil rather than a liquid eyeliner to create this look, make sure to blend the lower lash line with a small, flat brush to create a light shadow. Highlight the corners of the eyes with a white or nude pencil and apply a few coats of black mascara

Alina Milos is an international make-up artist and founder of Lin&Lo Mineral Make-up. She’s worked on photoshoots for specialist fashion magazines including Kaltblut, Sicky, Indie, and Wove and Chasseur.

I want to launch my own skincare brand. Where do I start?

Launching a skincare line requires not only total belief but a real passion for your products, so centre your brand on something you love – whether that’s a natural approach to beauty, science-led or something different altogether.

You also need to consider where your range will sit in the market and thoroughly research the competition you’ll be facing. It’s about creating a USP that really differentiates your brand.

Consistency is also key. Think about the visuals of your brand and make sure they translate through your packaging, website, social media and PR – it should be a united message and this repetition should also make it memorable. You then need to formulate a launch strategy, clearly mapping out each stage of your big unveil. For example, which areas you plan to do in-house and which elements you may outsource – like PR and marketing or asset creation.

Figure out key dates and important industry occasions to launch your products at, as this will help you retain clarity when things become overwhelming.

A third party’s objective eye can be incredibly valuable because when you’re close to a project it can be hard to take a step back.

Tamsin Styles is chief executive of British brand Ark Skincare. She oversees product development, marketing, brand partnerships and distribution.

What causes milia and how can I treat them?

Milia are the result of very dry skin or when a client’s complexion is not being cared for correctly. They appear as small white lumps on the skin, typically around the nose and eye area, and unfortunately can’t be removed by extraction like a blackhead or spot.

Milia occur when sebum and natural secretions of the skin get trapped deep in the epidermis and can’t escape in the normal way, becoming solid. The condition can occur in people of all ages.

Occasionally, milia will disappear on their own without intervention, but if they do need removing, it’s important clients come to you to get rid of them safely with a needle or laser.

A good skincare regime will help prevent the issue, so the sooner clients get into a routine the better. The key ingredients they need to be using to help the skin function include red seaweed, blue micro algae extract and hyaluronic acid.

I’ve also seen cases of milia that have been caused by the client’s diet, where acid and alkaline have become unbalanced because the client has been consuming too much dairy or citrus. You need to explain the effect diet has on the skin and give clients nutritional advice to help reduce the problem.

Donna Tait is co-founder of British skincare brand Katherine Daniels Cosmetics and has worked in the industry for 40 years.

This article appears in the Professional Beauty December 2017 Issue of Professional Beauty

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This article appears in the Professional Beauty December 2017 Issue of Professional Beauty